My Pop Life #218 : Bad ‘N’ Ruin – The Faces


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Bad ‘n’ Ruin  –  The Faces

Mother don’t you recognise your son?

*

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A battered dog-eared copy of Long Player by The Faces sits upright on the floor resting on the wedge of other battered and dog-eared LPs, in no order, just a stack for flicking through.  Elton John is in there, Jimi Hendrix, The Pretty Things, Cream, King Crimson, The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Janis Joplin, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Simon & Garfunkel. Dr John.   I was 14 and a half going on 15 and I was sitting cross-legged in my friend Simon’s bedroom, flicking, flicking.  Stuff I’d never heard of.  The Incredible String Band.  Stuff I didn’t like the sound of.  Humble Pie.  Stuff I liked – The Faces.  Damn what a band.  I knew the singer Rod Stewart from his number one hit singles (all with The Faces but credited to Rod Stewart) Maggie May, Stay With Me and You Wear It Well.  He was impossibly cool – relaxed, confident, cheeky, couldn’t care less.  Husky voice. Feathered haircut around his cheek bones, satin scarf, flares, cuban heels.  The rest of the band also couldn’t care less but were the coolest band I’d ever seen.  The Beatles always looked hyper-aware of their status as cultural leaders, and by now – 1971 – they’d split up, leaving a bewildered scene behind them as the pop landscape fragmented and rebuilt itself.  A moment acknowledged on the last track of Long Player – as a live recording catches Rod Stewart saying “Here’s a tune you may well know, may not know, but if you don’t know it, I really don’t know where you been“.  And they break into the mighty ‘Maybe I’m Amazed‘ from McCartney’s first solo album.  Suddenly The LP was everything, the single was losing its grip on the teen population as Pink Floyd, Genesis and Led Zeppelin started to indulge their musical whims and song lengths were stretching.  Some of these bands didn’t release singles. 1970s singles were of course at least as good as the 1960s crop – Gamble & Huff’s Philly Empire, 10cc, Elton John, Al Green, Bowie, T. Rex, Rod Stewart and all of the pop kings & queens of my youth, but the fact remains that Sgt Pepper changed the pop landscape and all bands poured energy into the LP from that point.  Long Player dated from 1970, I discovered it a couple of years later.

Lewes High St Malc McDonald

Rainbow

The Rainbow public house, Lewes High Street

The Faces were a band I just wished I was in.  They enjoyed themselves in an obviously infectious way, they genuinely liked each other I was sure.  They liked beer too which was important to me – I was by now drinking cider and beer.  Not in the pub – no, I couldn’t get in – but in the Magic Circle, too young to go into the pub and order a guinness & blackcurrant, lager & lime or pernod & orange.  We’d ask an older boy to buy us a quart bottle at the off-licence and carry it through the twitten and up the steps behind The Rainbow, where the bikers and greasers drank.  John Whippy (a white boy who had a ‘fro) Pete Davis & John Mote, Andrew Ranken and Simon’s sister Deborah Korner – all one or two giant years older than us.  The jukebox in The Rainbow was legendary but that would have to wait.  They were groovy older people with scruffy hair and gypsy-styled clothes.  They actually resembled The Faces come to think about it.

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Ian McLagan, Ron Wood, Ronnie Lane, Rod Stewart, Kenney Jones – The Faces

We were thirteen.  This does segue-way with an earlier story (My Pop Life #84) a small gang of urchins sat by Lewes Castle on a stone semi-circular seat under some trees passing the cider bottle and smoking Number 6 cigarettes.  Teenage laughter and giggles as we quickly got drunk on Woodpecker or Bulmers Cider.  Me, Pete Smurthwaite, Chris Clark, Conrad Ryle, Jon Foreman, Martin Elkins,  Simon Korner, Andrew Taylor, Adrian Birch, or any combination of these. We would just chat.  No portable music players then.  Music was for rooms.  Rooms were for smoking in.  We would wait our turn.  But in the meantime we could sit in Simon’s or Pete’s or Conrad’s bedroom and listen to records.  It was the main past-time of our teen years.  Playing football, listening to albums, drinking, smoking. Eventually girls.

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Ronnie Wood & Rod Stewart, early 70s

I did eventually buy this record but not until I left Lewes and went up to London for University in 1976.  It’s a wonderful piece of work – loose but tight, boogie-rock with mandolins and a Hammond organ, expressive and rhythmically funky and so full of character.  The Faces were formed out of The Small Faces who had produced a handful of explosive singles in the late 1960s – Tin Soldier, Lazy Sunday, Itchycoo Park – all with the incredible voice of Steve Marriott, a raspy bluesy rock voice that compelled attention.  When he left the band to form Humble Pie, the remaining members – Ian McLagan on keys, Kenney Jones on drums and Ronnie Lane on bass, joined with Rod Stewart & Ron Wood of The Jeff Beck Group to form The Faces.  They fitted perfectly.  The Faces made four albums together – Long Player was the 2nd – but by 1971 Rod Stewart was already making solo LPs, with the Faces as his backing band.  Then they became Rod Stewart & The Faces.  It almost goes without saying.  Ever-present on Top of the Pops, they effortlessly bestrode my impressionable years as the grooviest people and the best band in the universe.  The women in Rod’s lyrics were often older than him :

“the morning sun when it’s in your face really shows your age, but that don’t worry me none in my eyes you’re everything”

a face like that you got nothin’ to laugh about….red lips, hair & fingernails, they say you’re a mean old Jezebel”

“a little old-fashioned but that’s all right”

and he’s often waking up next to them. But he sees them as real women, with power over him, he spars with them.  Women loved him, but then so did men.

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I was lucky enough to see the group at Reading Festival in 1972 when they headlined on Saturday night, August 12th.  It was an eclectic selection of music that now reads like a who’s who of groovers, including Matching Mole (see My Pop Life #202), ELO AND WIZZARD !!!, Focus (see My Pop Life #103), Genesis with Peter Gabriel singing and Welsh band Man.  The Faces with Rod : that night spiritual leader Ronnie Lane wasn’t present and Tetsu was on bass.  They were simply awesome, playing Memphis, Miss Judy’s Farm, Angel, Stay With Me, True Blue, I’d Rather Go Blind, Too Bad, That’s All You Need, (I Know) I’m Losing You – and an encore – Twistin’ The Night Away/Every Picture Tells A Story, then finally Maggie May.  There is a bootleg of the gig recorded by a photographer from the pit which is very good apparently.  I was drunk and stoned and quite smelly having not washed since Thursday.  I think I was with Martin Cooper and Adrian Birch.  It was the year when John Peel was DJing between bands and on the Sunday he introduced us to Roxy Music, playing the mighty single Virginia Plain and changing my life forever, although I was not to know this yet.

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Rod Stewart aficionados – and we are legion – will know the classic Python Lee Jackson single In A Broken Dream which he sang at a session in the late sixties for a set of car-seat covers apparently.  Wonderful.  I’m also very fond of You Wear It Well and his Tim Hardin cover Reason To Believe, as is Paul Weller.  I heard about this somehow and convinced Paul to cover the song for my film New Year’s Day (see My Pop Life #90) which I haven’t discussed in much depth to be fair.  Yet.

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And his first few solo LPs really were remarkably good, with backing by The Faces before he famously left the UK and The Faces behind with Atlantic Crossing in 1975 with a slow side and a fast side and I Don’t Want To Talk About It and Sailing as the big-selling singles, recorded with three-quarters of Booker T & the MGs.  Stewart was also quick to blame Harold Wilson, British Prime Minister for a top rate of tax of 83% – although you had to be earning a large whack to have it apply to you.  He both won and lost a number of fans, which happened in the 1970s to many artists, the concept of “selling out” was still currency back then.  I still have a soft spot for the old fucker, but I preferred his work with the band who backed him in the early 1970s.

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Ronnie Lane was the first to leave in 1973 and they never really recovered.  Japanese bass player Tetsu Yamauchi replaced him, although strangely, having checked all the dates, Tetsu was playing the Reading Festival gig in August 1972, a year earlier.  Ronnie Wood joined the Rolling Stones in 1975, and Kenney Jones replaced Keith Moon in The Who after the drummer’s death from alcoholism-related drugs in 1978.  Ian MacLagan moved to the USA and continued performing and writing.  From time to time the lads would reform and play at special occasions.  No hard feelings.  Rock royalty all right.

The LP Long Player wears well and has stayed with me (is this a dreadful Faces pun sentence yet?) – although this dates to the vinyl age because I only ever listened to Side One which opens with that cracking tune Bad’N’Ruin.    Eventually I chose Bad ‘N’ Ruin as the music on my second Showreel proper.  The first one had Mahler’s 4th Symphony (see My Pop Life #62) a lush yearning romantic sweep that is possibly a little OTT, but hey, “You Got ta Put It Out There” as Sam Jackson once said on the set of Phantom Menace.

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So when I came to re-shoot and re-edit the greatest hits reel*, sometime in 2005-6 and beyond, updating it every so often, I needed some new music.  I didn’t worry about it for too long and went with The Faces because there’s something about the bounce and chop of the rhythm – Ronnie Lane on bass – Kenny Jones on drums – and Ron Wood bending the strings to get that blues shriek – oh and the line

Mother don’t you recognise your son?

which appealed to my strange sense of self.  Although the song is about (I think) a burglar going home to his mum (?), I turned it into an actor imagining his mum watching him on TV.   How ya like me now?  Given that I am a confirmed character actor now, an accent collector, enjoying the twists and turns of a rogue’s gallery of types and n’er-do-wells, it seemed appropriate.  But beneath this superficial and admittedly wrong reading of the song was I suspect a deeper sub-conscious impulse, and an even more backwards interpretation.  It was my song of escape from home, for I had joined the circus and run away. It is still my showreel music.

*With thanks to Richard Vaux and Take Five Studios in London’s Beak Street.

The record :

live on TV in 1971 :

 

the showreel :

https://vimeo.com/328316053

 

 

 

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2 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Shekhar Bhatia
    Apr 07, 2019 @ 08:35:33

    Thanks Ralph Geezer. I’ll read this in bed tonight and look forward to it.

    Football is a cruel game at time. Would have been great to have seen a brighton in the cup final.

    Still got great team, supporters and manager!

    Love To JJ too.

    Sb x

    >

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  2. Robert Milner
    Apr 23, 2019 @ 12:33:49

    I’d never listened to the Faces until I was, I want to say…12? 13? I came across an excellent interview with Kenny in Rhythm drum magazine around 1996 and that was during a febrile period of learning about the old greats. Happy memories – nicely assisted by this. Nice one, Ralph.

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